Monday, 8 June 2009

Golden



This is the rather ugly rendition (in the ever versatile though never graceful)in Microsoft Paint of something I have just agreed to as part of a deal that I have struck with a god. The inscritiption is 'Viridios Belenus-Lugus'; 'the great god Belenus-Lugus'. I hope that is a reasonable passing of the appropriate Romano-British-Latin!

I mentioned a while back about an
agreement I struck with Belenus this time last year - which he fulfilled on his part and I am currently in the process of fulfilling on mine.

Again this is a work related petition; same employer, different position and far better pay etc. Similar deal in many respects, though mainly ensuring any hurdles are not a problem and that once sorted the blasted paperwork with HR doesn't take as long to sort out - will be interesting to see if the number four recurs again.

This all falls within a 3 weeks period of daily devotionals I am carrying out directed toward Belenus-Lugus. I will do something on that when it isn't as late.

4 comments:

Bo said...

I would have gone for:

MAGNVS
BELEN
LVG

['great b. l.']

or

MAGNO
BEL
LVG

['to the great b. l.']

what you've written means 'to the green belenus-lugus'!

Bo said...

sorry-

MAGNO
BELEN
LVG

for the second one.

Lee said...

really? green? i was sure from something i had seen on TV with that guy de la bedoyere chap that 'viridios' was great god or mighty god?

oh well, good job you are here :) thanks!

Bo said...

It depends. I'm not sure what de la B. thinks it is, but as a British word 'Viridios' cd be connected to Mod W gwr, gwyr, and thus mean 'Manly One', but that leaves open the question of what the -id- is. Alternatively, de la B. might think the first element is a reduction of Ver-, meaning 'over', 'above', so *Veridios might mean 'One who is superior'.

Unfortunately, Viridios would have sounded to a speaker of British Latin like 'Greeny One' because Latin had a common word viridis, 'green', which we know was without doubt borrowed into British because it's the source of Mod Welsh 'gwyrdd', 'green'. This would tend to have pushed out any British near-homonym.

So to a Romano-Briton, what you've written wd be 'To greeny Belenus-Lugus'! They didn't write in British, except for names, so like I say, DEO MAGNO LVGVBELENO, 'to the great god Lugus-Belenus' wd likely be best. In British they wd have said 'deiwū marū lugubelenū [insert your name] sosin ieiuru', ('[Your name] dedicates this to the great god L-B') or something like that.